Test Menu

Code Test Name
Normal Range
84460 ALT/SGPT   0 – 40 IU/L
  SGPT is found in serum and in various bodily tissues and is commonly measured to determine liver health.
84450 AST/SGOT   0 – 42 IU/L
  SGOT is found in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, kidneys, brain, and red blood cells, and it is commonly measured clinically as a marker for liver health.
84520 BUN   7 – 18 mg/dl
  A blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test measures the amount of nitrogen in your blood that comes from the waste product urea. Urea is made when protein is broken down in your body. Urea is made in the liver and passed out of your body in the urine. A BUN test is done to see how well your kidneys are working.
10002 Chemistry Panel   See normal ranges for individual tests
  The Chemistry Panel consists of a Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c, Lipid Panel, ALT, AST, BUN and Creatinine.
82465 Cholesterol   < 200 mg/dl
  The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel Guidelines (NCEP ATP - III Guidelines) state that levels below 200 mg/dl are desirable, that levels between 200 and 239 are borderline high, and those 240 or greater are high. Interpretation of the results is based on the presumption of a 12 hour fast before collection of the sample. Recent medication, diet and other conditions may influence results.
82533 Cortisol AM
PM
3.5 – 25.0 mcg/dl
1.0 – 16.0 mcg/dl
  Cortisol is released in response to stress and a low level of blood glucocorticoids. Its primary functions are to increase blood sugar through gluconeogenesis; suppress the immune system; and aid in fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism. Chronic stress can contribute to several harmful physiological events. High levels of cortisol cause fat stores and excess circulating fat to be relocated and deposited deep in the abdomen, which left unchecked can develop into or enhance obesity. In addition, hypertension (high blood pressure), hyperlipidemia (elevated lipids), and hyperglycemia (elevated glucose) have been linked to elevated cortisol levels.
83887 Cotinine Non-Exposure < 50 ng/ml
  Cotinine is a metabolite of Nicotine and is measured as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke. The level of cotinine in the blood is directly proportional to the amount of exposure to tobacco smoke.
82565 Creatinine   0.0 – 1.4 mg/dl
  Creatinine is a break-down product of creatine phosphate in muscle, and is usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body. Creatinine is chiefly filtered out of the blood by the kidneys (glomerular filtration and proximal tubular secretion). There is little or no tubular reabsorption of creatinine. If the filtering of the kidney is deficient, creatinine blood levels rise.
86141 CRP Highly Sensitive Low Risk
Intermediate Risk
High Risk
Unspecified Elevation
< 1.0 mg/L
1.0 – 3.0 mg/L
3.0 – 10.0 mg/L
> 10.0 mg/L
  C-reactive protein (CRP) appears in higher amounts when there’s inflammation somewhere in your body.  A C-reactive Protein test can also be used to evaluate your risk of developing Coronary Artery Disease.
82947 Glucose  
  65 – 110 mg/dl
  Glucose is one of the three dietary monosaccharides which are absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. A high fasting glucose blood sugar level may be a sign of diabetes mellitus. 
83718 HDL Cholesterol Increased Risk
Decreased Risk
< 40 mg/dl
> 60 mg/dl
  The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel Guidelines (NCEP ATP - III Guidelines) state that levels below 40 mg/dl are indicative of an increased risk for Cardiovascular Disease while levels above 60 mg/dl show decreased risk. Interpretation of the results is based on the presumption of a 12 hour fast before collection of the sample. HDL is often referred to as the “good” cholesterol.
83036 Hemoglobin A1c   < 6.0%
  Hemoglobin A1c, also known as A1c, measures your average blood sugar over the last 2 to 3 months. This test measures how much sugar is attached to a certain protein in your red blood cells and is not affected by your fasting level (the length of time elapsed since you last consumed any food or drink that contained calories).
83721 LDL   60 – 129 mg/dl
  The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel Guidelines (NCEP AT-III Guidelines) state that LDL is the primary target of cholesterol-lowering therapy and that it considers levels of < 100 mg/dl as optimal. Interpretation of the results is based on the presumption of a 12 hour fast before collection of the sample.
80061 Lipid Panel   See normal ranges for individual tests
  The Lipid Panel consists of Total Cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, LDL Cholesterol, VLDL Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Total Cholesterol to HDL Ratio, and a LDL to HDL Ratio. Interpretation of the results is based on the presumption of a 12 hour fast before collection of the sample.
84153 PSA Male 0.00 – 4.00 ng/ml
  PSA is used to evaluate the possibility of patients having prostatic carcinoma. 3% of males over age 40 and 18% of enlarged prostate patients have PSA levels ranging from 4 to 10 ng/ml. PSA levels below 4.0 are within the accepted reference range and are considered normal. While an elevated PSA result is not an automatic indicator of prostate disease, a low number, all by itself, does not necessarily rule out a problem. Only your physician, comparing your PSA result with that of a digital rectal exam, can make an accurate assessment of your current prostate health.
84403 Testosterone Male 220 – 850 ng/dl
  A link between diabetes and low testosterone is well established. Men with diabetes are more likely to have low testosterone, and men with low testosterone are more likely to later develop diabetes. Testosterone helps the body's tissues take up more blood sugar in response to insulin. Obesity and low testosterone are also tightly linked. Obese men are more likely to have low testosterone while men with very low testosterone are also more likely to become obese.
84478 Triglyceride Normal
Borderline High
< 150 mg/dl
150 – 200 mg/dl
  Triglycerides are the main constituents of vegetable oil (typically more unsaturated) and animal fats (typically more saturated) In humans, triglycerides are a mechanism for storing unused calories, and their high concentration in blood correlates with the consumption of starchy and other high carbohydrate foods. The National Cholesterol Education Program sets guidelines for triglyceride levels. High triglyceride levels may lead to heart disease, especially in people with low levels of "good" cholesterol and high levels of "bad" cholesterol, and in people with type 2 diabetes.
84443 TSH   0.4 – 5.0 uIU/ml
  The amount of TSH present is directly related to both hyperthyroidism, an overactive thyroid, and hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid.
82306 Vitamin D (25-OH) Optimal Level 30 – 80 ng/ml
  Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many common and serious diseases, including some common cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. Illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, and depression have also been linked to a lack of vitamin D.